Tag Archives | Video

The Network Matters

A few posts ago, I talked about ‘Acceptable Ads‘ from networks like The DECK, Fusion Ads, Carbon Ads, InfluAds, Yoggrt, and Ad Packs by BuySellAds. I argued that these networks are working to become curators of content, not just broadcasters of the highest bidder, and as a result, the products they advertise get additional value out of just being picked to be featured in the ads.

Field Notes is another brand owned by Coudal Partners, the company behind The DECK, and they recently created a banner ad that caught my eye:

Red Field Notes

As you can see, there’s no call to action, no product shot and no sales pitch. Instead, there’s just a colored box, a product name and the fact that they ‘made a red one’.

If you aren’t already familiar with Field Notes, or aren’t the world’s biggest fan of the color red, you might look right past this ad without a second thought. And if you were to compare it to the Anatomy of the Perfect Banner Ad from BuySellAds, this banner would fail every test.

However, because Field Notes has such a long standing presence on The DECK, and because readers of sites that feature ads from The DECK trust the network to only highlight products they might be interested in, Field Notes is free to focus on a single point they’re trying to get across; that their notebooks, which specialize in creative colors and seasonal varieties, are now available in red.

It’s a simple message, but perhaps the most effective given the audience’s existing familiarity with the product, and trust in the network.

If you click on the ad (because how are you NOT going to click on an ad like that?) you’re presented with a fantastic video that explains the new red color, and tells an inspiring tale of love and adventure:

As Coudal Partners says on their site:

When you’re your own client, and there’s no one to step all over your ideas, what happens? Well for us anyhow, we wind up with a series of promotional films that hardly ever mention the product, or only mention it tangentially.

Apparently that philosophy extends to their banner ads as well.

Coudal also goes on to point out videos for their Fire Spotter, Northerly and Monona County Fair editions of Field Notes, which each featured new colors and a new story to tell, but didn’t feature a lot of the product being pushed down your throat.

While this doesn’t work for everyone, it’s important to keep in mind that there are other factors to an ad’s success besides just the image and the copy. Something as simple as the network that it runs on can have a huge effect on the response the ad receives.

In my next post, I’ll dive deeper into this trend of brands and networks as curators of content.

Lay’s Potato Chip Vending Machine

Lays Machine

Lay’s Potato Chips contain just three ingredients: potatoes, vegetable oil, and salt. However, in a world where ingredient lists frequently cover half a product’s packaging, and ingredients themselves are 20 character contractions that even scientists struggles to understand, it’s safe to say that most people assume a snack food like potato chips must contain a smorgasbord of unnatural ingredients and chemical byproducts in order to taste so good.

To prove them wrong, Castro, an agency out of Argentina, developed a special vending machine the turns raw potatoes into bags of potato chips right before your very eyes.

Lays Machine Detail

Upon entering a store where the vending machine is on display, consumers are handed a potato with a sticker on it that directs them to take the potato to the snack isle and insert it into the Lay’s machine.

Once dropped into the machine (which only accepts potatoes; no coins allowed) a movement sensor triggers a one-minute video that walks consumers through the six-step process of creating a potato chip: Washing, Peeling, Cutting, Cooking, Salting and Packaging. A light-up guide highlights each step, and at the end of the process, a finished bag of Lay’s Potato Chips pops out of the machine.

What’s most impressive is that Castro even took care of the small details, such as a heater that warms each bag so that it comes out feeling like a freshly cooked potato. Details like that are often overlooked, but really go a long way towards completing the experience for the consumer, and helping the message sink in.

While some criticize the fact that a video is used instead of a tiny potato chip factory, because a video doesn’t support the message of being 100% natural, I think most consumers are impressed enough by the experience, and that the added headache of building a real potato chip factory inside the vending machine would not be worth the marginal increase in amazement. (It would just take one wild potato spilling hot oil all over the inside of the machine to cause a cleanup mess big enough to halt the whole idea

Experience Prizes Keep Contests Alive

Contests, giveaways and sweepstakes have always been a great way to get a brand in front of a large number of people, but interest in the campaign usually wanes as soon as the winner is announced. To combat that trend, many contests have turned into hunts for the next online cewebrity, where the winner gets a chance to extend their 15 minutes of fame through the sponsor